STRUGGLING WITH CLUTTER IN YOUR SMALL LIVING SPACE

Clutter can mean very different things to different people. A good rule of thumb is if an item is broken or not useful, not aesthetically pleasing or sentimental, it’s probably part of your clutter and it may be time to toss it or donate it. The true definition of clutter is to fill or cover with scattered or disordered things that impede movement or reduce effectiveness. Not only can clutter reduce your effectiveness in everyday life but can also affect the mind. Clutter can affect anxiety levels, sleep patterns and your ability to focus. 

 

Unless you’re living in the home of your dreams, you probably have to work with the limited space that you have. Small rooms can fill up quickly and the addition of clutter will only make you feel that much more cramped. Here are some reasons why your space may be in disarray.

 

1.     Inability to Let Go: Many people tend to hold on to a specific piece of clothing or home item if it’s sentimental, a gift or being saved for a just-in-case event. Emotions can make belongings feel irreplaceable, but you should recognize when something is ready to go.

 

2.     Lack of Organizational Routine: Most clutter piles get bigger simply because they become part of the general landscape. By implementing a functional routine, cleaning could become second nature and clutter won’t have time to accumulate.

 

3.     Impulse Shopping: Impulse buying can be a recipe for disaster. Don’t buy sale items or hobby supplies if you’re not sure where to store them or when they’ll be used. Buying on impulse may give instant gratification, but it probably won’t help you in the long run.

 

So when you finally get serious about cleaning up and clearing out your space, it’s important to analyze your living style and understand how your physical space can help you, rather than work against you. To learn more about the potential effects of clutter in your life, continue reading below! Struggling With Clutter from Mo2 Properties

Guest Contributor: Grant Kamperschroer

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